Helping the blind see with their tongue

“Technology, for me, it’s giving something back to somebody who was taken out of humanity.” –



What if we told you there are new innovations that can help about 285 million people around the world living with a visual impairment move around with a little more ease?

Okay, it’s easy enough to believe, but what if we told you the innovation works by using the surface of their tongues?

Now here’s something that should be celebrated: there’s an increasing number of sensory-substitution devices being developed that use the brain in the most remarkable way. These devices take in visual information from the environment and translate it into forms of physical touch or sound in order to be interpreted by the user as vision.



If that’s not amazing enough, The New Yorker lets us in on yet another benefit:

“While these devices were designed with the goal of restoring lost sensation, in the past decade they have begun to revise our understanding of brain organization and development. The idea that underlies sensory substitution is a radical one: that the brain is capable of processing perceptual information in much the same way, no matter which organ delivers it.”

The brain is capable of so much more than we’ve ever imagined!

Vision helps us feel like a part of our tribe.

He told me that he had never seen the world particularly well even before he became totally blind. “With the BrainPort, it’s similar to what I used to be able to see like,” he said. “Shapes, shades of light and dark—where things basically were, but not anything super-vivid, you know?”

“When you go blind, you get kicked out of the club,” Weihenmayer told me. Using the BrainPort, he said, makes him feel like part of the gang again. He can see what his family is doing, without anyone needing to tell him. And he can never forget seeing his son smile for the first time. “I could see his lips sort of shimmering, moving,” Weihenmayer said. “And then I could see his mouth just kind of go ‘Brrrrp’ and take over his whole face. And that was cool, because I’d totally forgotten that smiles do that.



Weihenmayer is working to make it possible for everyone to live without barriers in their life, with a movement thriving on the motto, “what’s within you is stronger than what’s in your way.” Learn more about No Barriers to be inspired by a beautiful community.

Technology, at its core, is developed to add something to our lives; to break down our barriers, provide ease, increase efficiency, and shine light into the dark spaces.

But this is only progress that can happen if we’re all talking about the fantastic advances being made in technology, and finding ways to make them easily accessible for those who hold the desire to include these devices in their lives. Please, share this article within your own circles so that this information will land in the right hands.

click on this link below to see how a blind man see with his tongue

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